Black Unemployment Driven By White America’s Favors For Friends

By Janel Ross, Huffingtonpost.com

"Across all three states where I did my research, I heard over and over again [white] people admitting that they don't interact very often with nonwhites, not at work, not at home or otherwise," said DiTomaso about the 246 interviews with working-class and middle-class whites she did over the course of about a decade in Tennessee, Ohio and New Jersey. "So how would they pass opportunities and information across race lines?"

“Across all three states where I did my research, I heard over and over again [white] people admitting that they don’t interact very often with nonwhites, not at work, not at home or otherwise,” said DiTomaso about the 246 interviews with working-class and middle-class whites she did over the course of about a decade in Tennessee, Ohio and New Jersey. “So how would they pass opportunities and information across race lines?”

There’s a comforting-to-white-people fiction about racism and racial inequality in the United States today: They’re caused by a small, recalcitrant group who cling to their egregiously inaccurate beliefs in the moral, intellectual and economic superiority of white people.

The reality: racism and racial inequality aren’t just supported by old ideas, unfounded group esteem or intentional efforts to mistreat others, said Nancy DiTomaso, author of the new book, The American Non-Dilemma: Racial Inequality Without Racism. They’re also based on privilege, she said — how it is shared, how opportunities are hoarded and how most white Americans think their career and economic advantages have been entirely earned, not passed down or parceled out.

The way that whites, often unconsciously, hoard and distribute advantage inside their almost all white networks of family and friends is one of the driving reasons that in February just 6.8 percent of white workers remained unemployed while 13.8 percent of black workers and 9.6 percent of Hispanic workers were unable to find jobs, DiTomaso said….

black-unemployment

Since black unemployment rates are far higher than white rates, the number of people in a typical black social network who are in a position to help is far more limited.

It’s not that black workers don’t attempt the same sort of job assists within their own networks, said Deirdre Royster, an economic sociologist at New York University and author of Race and the Invisible Hand: How White Networks Exclude Black Men From Blue Collar Jobs…

According to Royster, there’s an additional twist: When blacks are aware of a job, they describe the job, the boss, the company and its preferences and needs. Then they follow up with a warning.

“They give the person looking for a job all sorts of information and then they say, ‘But don’t tell them I sent you,'” said Royster.

Black workers are aware of something that researchers are still trying to explain: White bosses often worry, lack of statistical evidence aside, that black workers are more likely to sue them or band together in the workplace and try to change things, Royster said. That seems all the more likely if the black workers already know one another, she said. And many white hiring managers still assume, consciously or unconsciously, that black workers bring undesirable workplace habits and qualities, Royster said.

Read the full article here.

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Bob Teague, WNBC Reporter Who Helped Integrate TV News, Is Dead at 84

By Douglas Martin, The New York Times

Bob Teague, who joined WNBC-TV in New York in 1963 as one of the city’s first black television journalists and went on to work as a reporter, anchorman and producer for more than three decades, died on Thursday in New Brunswick, N.J. He was 84.

The cause was T-cell lymphoma, his wife, Jan, said.

Mr. Teague established a reputation for finding smart, topical stories and delivering them with sophistication. Though he later criticized TV news as superficial and too focused on the appearance of reporters and anchors, his own good looks and modulated voice were believed to have helped his longevity in the business.

Bob Teague was one of the first black television correspondents in New York.

Bob Teague was one of the first black television correspondents in New York.

Mr. Teague followed in the footsteps of Mal Goode, who became the first black network TV reporter in 1962. Mr. Goode was assigned to the ABC News United Nations bureau because network executives feared his presence in the main studio would be too disruptive, TV Guide reported. WNBC, the NBC-owned station in New York, hired Mr. Teague, a seasoned newspaper reporter, the next year. As racial tensions mounted in the 1960s, he was often sent into minority neighborhoods. In July 1963, he was a principal correspondent for “Harlem: Test for the North,” an hour long network program prepared after riots broke out in the neighborhood…

The changing public response to Mr. Teague and others in the first wave of black television journalists was suggested in a letter he received that he described in an article in The New York Times Magazine.

“When you first began broadcasting the news on television, I watched you every night, but I realize now, years later, that I was so conscious of the fact that you were black that I didn’t hear a word you said about the news,” it read.

“Now, I am happy to say, I still watch you every night, but only because you are a damn good newscaster.”

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Dr. Boyce: March Madness Revenue Exceeds $1 Billion, Players Get Harmed in the Process

By. Dr. Boyce Watkins, From BlackBlueDog.Com

In case you’re not aware, the NCAA is big, really big.  This professional sports league that disguises itself as being amateur is rolling in money and profitability.  Much of this excess is driven by the fact that their competitors, the NFL, NBA and Major League baseball, have one line item in their budgets that the NCAA does not have:  The cost of compensating their players.

President Obama's 2013 Bracket. Courtesy of Whitehouse.gov

President Obama’s 2013 Bracket. Courtesy of Whitehouse.gov

 

For the first time ever, ad revenue from March Madness has crossed the $1 billion dollar mark.   According to Kantar Media, no other professional sports league has surpassed this number.  The NFL took in in a “measly” $976 million and the NBA was even more embarrassing at $537 million.  Oh, Major League Baseball was barely worth mentioning, at $354 million….

As a Finance Professor, educator and a black man, I will just say this:  This system is financially corrupt.  No one turns on an NCAA tournament game to see the coach, they only want to see the players….

 

Secondly, I can say that after teaching for 20 years on college campuses with big time athletics programs, the schedule of a professional athlete often keeps players away from fully pursuing their academic responsibilities.  I’ll never forget the time I tutored a student who told me that his coaches asked him to change his major to find one that was more suitable for his football schedule.   The coaches looked at me like a lunatic for suggesting that perhaps he was in college to study and not just play football.

Third, as a black man, I can say that this is the second -most racially-exploitative system in America behind the Prison Industrial Complex.  In both cases, a set of illogical laws have been put in place to extract billions of dollars in labor from a group of people without giving them fair compensation.  A massive amount of wealth is taken from the African American community every single year, as our greatest athletes run and jump for all-white crowds and corporate sponsors who get rich from our extraordinary talent….

Read the Original Blog Post Here

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Why the Steubenville rape case should be a wake-up call for young black men

By: Mychal Denzel Smith, From TheGrio.com

Ma'lik Richmond, 16, top, hugs his mother Daphne Birden, after closing arguments were made on the fourth day of the juvenile trial he and co-defendant Trent Mays, 17, on rape charges in juvenile court on Saturday, March 16, 2013 in Steubenville, Ohio. Mays and Richmond are accused of raping a 16-year-old West Virginia girl in August, 2012. Judge Thomas Lipps said he would render a decision on Sunday morning, March 17. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic, Pool)

Ma’lik Richmond, 16, top, hugs his mother Daphne Birden, after closing arguments were made on the fourth day of the juvenile trial he and co-defendant Trent Mays, 17, on rape charges in juvenile court on Saturday, March 16, 2013 in Steubenville, Ohio. Mays and Richmond are accused of raping a 16-year-old West Virginia girl in August, 2012. Judge Thomas Lipps said he would render a decision on Sunday morning, March 17. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic, Pool)

 

There was video evidence of the assault that took place in Steubenville, Ohio last August, yet observers of the case from near and far were still surprised yesterday when Trent Mays and Ma’lik Richmond were found guilty of rape by a judge in the rape a 16-year-old girl.

The two high school football players sobbed uncontrollably as Judge Thomas Lipps told them his verdicts, and while they’ll always have their defenders, a great many people were relieved that the courts ruled the way they did. Still, that there was ever any doubt speaks to the sad of state of affairs when it comes to handling rape in this society.

 

The details of the assault are disturbing to anyone with a half a conscience. The heavily-intoxicated girl was carried from home to home, party to party, presumably passed out when she wasn’t vomiting, while Richmond and Mays, seeing no cause for concern, penetrated her with their fingers and a teammate captured the assault on a camera phone. She was taken to a basement, where the assault continued and more pictures were taken, while other party goers and bystanders did nothing….

It would seem a clear-cut case, as she was at no point in a position to consent to any activity, let alone sexual activity, and Mays and Richmond clearly violated her. Yet the defense attorneys still argued that because she made the decision to drink heavily and never “affirmatively” said no, she consented to sex. Also consider that high school football is king in the economically-depressed town of Steubenville and the players are generally treated as royalty. In a text message, Mays says head coach Reno Saccoccia was joking about the incident and that the coach “took care of it for us.”

What’s most disturbing about this whole case is just how ordinary it is. This wasn’t an aberration, the result of some particularly vile and demented boys deciding to rape a young girl.

Trent Mays, 17, left, and co-defendant Malik Richmond, 16, sit in court before the start of the third day of their trial on rape charges at the Jefferson County Justice Center in Steubenville, Ohio, on Friday. ASSOCIATED PRESS

Trent Mays, 17, left, and co-defendant Malik Richmond, 16, sit in court before the start of the third day of their trial on rape charges at the Jefferson County Justice Center in Steubenville, Ohio, on Friday. ASSOCIATED PRESS

Rape like this is far more common than we care to admit. This is what a culture of toxic masculinity, as Jaclyn Friedman described it in The American Prospect, produces. From an early age, we teach young boys that girls/women are prizes, trophies to be obtained as the result of some kind of heroism or achievement. They learn they’re owed the sexual attention of girls by virtue of their being born male….

As punishment, Mays and Richmond will go away to a juvenile detention center for at least a year. When they’re released, they may have to register as sex offenders. The lives they previously envisioned for themselves no longer exist. In a perfect world, this would send a message to other boys that rape is unacceptable, that only yes means yes, and women’s bodies are their own…

Because it’s easy to write this off as an isolated incident, the result of the actions of a few savage adolescents. But to do so is to deny that these boys are products of a culture that in myriad ways has told them this was not only acceptable but expected of them. While Mays and Richmond are locked away trying to learn their lesson, the rest of us would be prudent to do the same.

Read the Original Article Here

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Detroit Now Has a White, Republican Mayor and City Council: State Take Over Coming to a Black City Near You

By: Reverend Charles E. Williams II, The Huntington Post Black Voices

Rick Snyder  48th Governor of Michigan

Rick Snyder 48th Governor of Michigan

 

Sounds Confusing right? I know Detroit has seen its better days, and certainly with The Kwame Kilpatrick stain the rehabilitation of its reputation will take time and leadership to change it, but the latest national trending news is the most disheartening story that anybody could tell. The Day Democracy Died in Detroit. Just Recently, the Governor of the State of Michigan decided that the Democratic process just doesn’t work anymore and placed the city of Detroit under emergency management, giving himself and his proxy, Mr. Kevyn Orr, all power to usurp local authority on any decision that a legislative or executive branch body would make according to Huffingtonpost.com

Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder announced Tuesday that the state would appoint an emergency financial manager to Detroit. Beginning Monday, Washington D.C. bankruptcy lawyer Kevyn Orr will begin examining the city’s finances in the hopes that in the next 18 months he can make a dent in its massive debts.

Detroit’s reputation was mired across the world with the fiscal crisis stain Governor Snyder enacted in his first few months in office: a law called Public Act 4. Months later, 203,238 signatures placed this law on the 2012 ballot and 2,182,504 votes repealed it. This law basically gives all power within a municipality to one person who only is required to respond to the one who appointed him: the governor. Citizens spoke up and spoke out, utilizing the power of the ballot box, but the house, senate and governors office used the power of partisan politics, and rushed the new legislation, called public act 436 in the lame duct session that was also used to make Michigan a right to work state.

Now in 2013, the vote of citizens in Detroit and other cities across the state will effectively be rendered useless. No vote, no voice. Our mayor and city council simply can’t do anything but tap dance around the governor.

Detroit Skyline

Detroit Skyline

I often think about those who sacrificed their lives, like Goodman; Chaney and Shwarner; Medgar Evers, who was gunned down in a driveway in front his wife and kids; Fannie Lou Hamer, beaten bloodied in a jail cell; Dr. king and Ralph Abernathy. It’s a shame to think about so much sacrifice and and so much blood. I also think about those who came to Detroit, like my grandparents who left the south in the great migration because Jim Crow and tactics like poll taxes and grandfather clauses were the law of the land.

So here we are 2013. I’m 32 years old and I’m forced to see the conditions and new tactics that have been displayed to suppress and dismantle democracy, break the back of workers and directly attack our voting rights.

 

Read the Original Article Here

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Additional Articles on Detroit and EFM Here

 

Kimani Gray: Another NYPD Usual Suspect?

By  Edward Wyckoff Williams, TheRoot.com

Photo of Kimani Gray and his younger sister is illuminated by candles at memorial, March 13, 2013. (Allison Joyce/Getty Images)

Photo of Kimani Gray and his younger sister is illuminated by candles at memorial, March 13, 2013. (Allison Joyce/Getty Images)

Kimani Gray, a 16-year-old boy from the Flatbush neighborhood of Brooklyn, N.Y., was gunned down by two plainclothes officers last Saturday night. According to official New York City Police Department reports, the officers on patrol approached Kimani when he separated himself from the group he was with and “adjusted his waistband” in “a suspicious manner.” Police say that Kimani had a small revolver — though an eyewitness says the young boy had no weapon at all and was “running for his life.”

 

Officers fired 11 shots, mortally wounding Kimani. The handgun, which police claim belonged to Kimani, had not been fired, and forensic reports confirming that the gun was actually in his possession have yet to be released. As such, Kimani’s family and friends remain highly suspicious. “We were just hanging out,” 15-year-old Akeem Brown, who was one of six friends with Kimani that night, told the New York Daily News. “We didn’t know he had a gun.”…

Kimani Gray, 16, with his mother Carol Gray. Kimani was killed by police after he allegedly pulled a gun on March 9, 2013.

Kimani Gray, 16, with his mother Carol Gray. Kimani was killed by police after he allegedly pulled a gun on March 9, 2013.

As the facts of this particular case continue to unfold, it remains to be seen whether Kimani will be added to the list of innocent young black males killed by the NYPD. Among the most noteworthy — but who hardly constitute an exhaustive list — of victims are Amadou Diallo, Sean Bell and Ramarley Graham. Diallo was shot at 41 times — 19 of which hit and killed him — in 1999 by four New York City police officers in the Soundview section of the Bronx. Diallo, 23, was unarmed and reaching for his wallet to provide identification. All four officers were acquitted of his murder…

This is the America in which young black males live — always and everywhere suspected of violent crime, guilty before proved innocent. The NYPD has been quick to release information suggesting that Kimani had a criminal record. His past violations, according to police reports, include possession of stolen property and inciting a riot….

Kimani Gray’s death is worrisome mostly because of the NYPD’s dark history on matters of racial violence — leaving members of the community to wonder about the veracity of the department’s version of events and to question if a gun was planted on the teenager to justify the shooting. Brooklyn residents, many of whom seek an end to the all-too-common violence experienced by black and brown people at the hands of New York’s law-enforcement officers, have found a new martyr to give voice to an old cause and have taken to the streets to protest.

 

Read the full story Here

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Latest effort to get boxer Jack Johnson a posthumous pardon is hitting a wall

By Anita Kumar, The Sacramento Bee

A 1910 photo postcard shows boxer Jack Johnson. He became the heavyweight champion on July 4 of that year. The Nevada Historical Society via Associated Press

A 1910 photo postcard shows boxer Jack Johnson. He became the heavyweight champion on July 4 of that year. The Nevada Historical Society via Associated Press

For nine years, a pair of Capitol Hill lawmakers have asked the president of the United States to pardon posthumously American boxing legend Jack Johnson.

President George W. Bush did not act, but in 2009 the congressmen thought they might be able to persuade the nation’s first African American president to do so on behalf of the world’s first African American heavyweight boxing champion. But President Barack Obama hasn’t issued a pardon, either, and his administration says it’s unlikely he will.

Sen. John McCain of Arizona and Rep. Peter King of New York, both Republicans now joined by two Democrats, again introduced a congressional resolution last week calling on Obama to pardon Johnson a century after his racially motivated conviction of taking a woman across state lines for immoral purposes.

“As we look back on our nation’s history, the Jack Johnson case is a shameful stain, apparent to all,” McCain said recently. “Rectifying this injustice is long overdue.”…

Jack Johnson vs Jim Jeffries. In 1910 for the Heavyweight Championship of the World

Jack Johnson vs Jim Jeffries. In 1910 for the Heavyweight Championship of the World

The Justice Department, however, generally doesn’t consider pardons for people after they die, according to department guidelines. Those investigations are lengthy and complex, and the department would rather spend its resources on the pardon and commutation requests of living people.

Posthumous pardons are extremely rare.

Johnson, born to former slaves in Texas, was initially denied the right to fight professionally because of his race. When he was finally granted the opportunity, he defeated the titleholder to become the first African American heavyweight champion…

Johnson’s success in the ring and indulgent lifestyle prompted resentment and a search for a white boxer who could beat him, dubbed the “great white hope.” After Johnson defeated a white champion who returned from retirement, riots broke out in several cities.

Soon after, an all-white jury convicted Johnson of transporting a white girlfriend across state lines, under the Mann Act, a law designed to prevent trafficking of women for prostitution. He eventually served 366 days in prison.

 

 

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George Wallace’s Daughter, Peggy Kennedy Wallace Aims To Fight Her Father’s Legacy

From the Huffington Post, Black Voices

Peggy Wallace-Kennedy and Rev. Joseph Lowery  in 2009. Photo By Kevin Glackmeyer

Peggy Wallace-Kennedy and Rev. Joseph Lowery in 2009. Photo By Kevin Glackmeyer

Forty eight years ago today, some 600 civil rights marchers headed east out of Selma, Alabama toward Montgomery. The demonstrators only made it six blocks to the Edmond Pettus Bridge before they were confronted by state and local police carrying billy clubs and tear gas for what infamously became known as “Bloody Sunday.”

At the time, Alabama governor George Wallace–known for his declaration ofsegregation now, segregation tomorrow and segregation forever,”— ordered the march to be stopped on grounds of public safety. Wallace’s strong words and actions have left a dark stain of bigotry and discrimination on his family’s legacy–one his daughter, Peggy Kennedy Wallace is looking to change.

Today, Kennedy Wallace, who is writing a book about the impact her father’s politics had on his family, has walked across Edmond Pettus Bridge hand in hand with Congressman John Lewis.

“I told him, ‘I’ve crossed many bridges in my life, and I’ll cross many, many more. But the most important bridge I’ll ever cross in my life is the one I crossed with you,’ in 2009,” she said.

Lewis, who was recently moved to tears when an Alabama police chief apologized for failing to protect the Freedom Riders during a trip to Montgomery, was badly beaten on the bridge that fateful day.

It’s the same sort of growth that Kennedy Wallace says she’s aiming to achieve for her family, herself and others.

“I just would like for my children to not remember where my father stood, but where I am standing now.”

Read the full article  Here

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Frank Ocean, and Why Blacks Need to Finally Get Over Homophobia

By Ernest Owens, TheHuffingtonPost

Bayard Rustin and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in conversation.

Bayard Rustin and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in conversation.

Last summer I watched as all of my friends were in shock that the man they knew as Frank Ocean, the R&B/hip-hop crooner who sang songs that made women squeal revealed an intimate secret. Mr. Ocean told the world in a blog that he was once in love with a man. And that was about it. No coming out of the closet to the world as many assumed, and no official declaration of any new sexual orientation…

Shocking, I give you that. Heroic, I think not. I think it is time for blacks to wake up and respect and recognize the real members of color in the LGBT community that have paved the way for us with their time and due diligence…

 

Bayard Rustin. Does his name ring a bell? He was a pioneer for civil rights and gay rights during a time in our history when fighting for both would have been fatal. Rustin was arrested numerous times for being openly gay. And when not working with Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., he was out being the chief organizer of the famous March on Washington. Rustin died in 1987, and while we celebrate the legacy of Malcolm X and Dr. King, I would argue that we don’t respect Rustin’s work as much due to the fact that he was gay….

We are going backwards in our society and not forward in our thinking. Where is our modern day Bayard Rustin? When will we ever see someone follow the footsteps of James Baldwin? When will we see such fierce and courageous sacrifice and real fearlessness? It’s a damn shame in our community when we consider just coming out a victory rather than a launch….

Frank Ocean Performs

Frank Ocean Performs

It is 2013. We are long past the excuses and the denial, Black America. Whether you are ready to accept it or not, there are LGBT members in our community that are working beside you each and every day. And no, they are not all like Frank Ocean who have isolated experiences and will still adorn female strippers, but actually those who are openly gay and have lives that reflect such. It’s high time we stop discriminating and being ignorant to our own. Bayard Rustin once said that “to be afraid is to behave as if the truth were not true.” We are at a point where we know the truth and to avoid it now would be to enslave ourselves in ignorance. I thought we came a long way from that.

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Medical Apartheid

Compelling, if at times gruesome, Medical Apartheid connects past medical experiments and the woeful current state of health care for blacks.

By , Mother Jones magazine

A scientist from the Tuskeegee Experiment with an object of study.

A scientist from the Tuskeegee Experiment with an object of study.

In this provocatively titled book, Harriet Washington argues that the infamous “Tuskegee Experiment”—the 40-year study in which black men with syphilis were allowed to die untreated so that their cadavers could be used for research—was not an isolated incident, but rather one example of the medical establishment’s long history of mistreating African Americans. Compelling, if at times gruesome, Medical Apartheid draws a connection between past medical experiments and the woeful current state of health care for blacks.

Medical Apartheid is peppered with chilling anecdotes of racist exploitation, curiosity, and control. There is the story of John Brown, a slave purchased in Georgia in the 1820s, whose owner, a doctor, blistered his legs and arms on a daily basis to see how deep his black skin went. Far from merely cataloging horrors, Washington, a journalist and former fellow in ethics at Harvard Medical School, also illustrates what she calls the “dual face” of these abuses, pointing out that the exploitation of black subjects made numerous medical advances possible. Medical Apartheid book coverFor example, Dr. Marion Sims, a 19th-century gynecological pioneer, was only able to achieve his breakthroughs by performing horrific surgeries without anesthesia on his female slaves….

One of the most harmful contemporary legacies of this history of abusive medical experimentation is that many African Americans are wary of participating in potentially life saving medical studies. A recent study in the American Journal of Law and Medicineestimated that only 1 percent of the nearly 20 million Americans enrolled in biomedical studies are black. This reluctance, though justified, has meant that blacks often miss out on the latest treatments and breakthroughs.

Read the full review here.

Listen to author Harriet Washington read from the book here.

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