Breaking News

When the past is present…

“…The great force of history comes from the fact that we carry it within us, are unconsciously controlled by it in many ways, and history is literally present in all that we do.” James Baldwin

 

Watch: My Black History: Michael Eric Dyson on How MLK’s Assassination Opened His Eyes

From: The Root

Video Created by: P.J. Rickards

 

To commemorate the month of February and its celebration of Black History, Michael Eric Dyson (author, professor, and ordained minister) reflects on how the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. changed Dyson’s perspective on racial injustice.

Dyson’s lesson learned from MLK’s assassination is best summarized as he states,

“…his death, which gave rise to so much in the aftermath, his blood mixed in the soil from it sprouted an entire new awareness and consciousness that led from his assassination to 40 years later to the inauguration of Barack Hussein Obama.”

Read more about Michael Dyson’s full reflection here.

 

To learn more about social justice organizations and leaders during the Civil Rights Movement click here.

 

Read more Breaking News here

 

Chance The Rapper Finally Won A Grammy. Then Another One.

From: Huffington Post Black Voices

Written by: Lilly Workneh

Chance The Rapper received the Grammy for Best Rap Performance with the track “No Problem.” The win marks the 23-year-old Chicago native’s first Grammy award win in his young, prominent career, in only his first year of Grammy eligibility.

KEVIN WINTER VIA GETTY IMAGES

As Lilly Workneh writes in her article, Chance used his second win of the night to give an impassioned speech:

“‘Glory be to God. I claim this victory in the name of the Lord,’ he said onstage accepting the award for Best New Artist. The rapper also acknowledged what the accomplishment means to him as an independent artist. ‘I know that people think independence means you do it by yourself but independence means freedom. I do it with these folks right here’ he said.”

Chance went on to win three Grammys over the course of the night. Read more about Chance’s historic evening in the full article here.

Read about hip-hop as a gateway to black poetry here.

Read more Breaking News here.

 

Attending College Doesn’t Close Wage Gap and Other Myths

From: The Root (February 6, 2017)
Written By: Kirsten West Savali

In a recent post, “Attending College Doesn’t Close Wage Gap and Other Myths Exposed in New Report,” Kirsten West Savali exposes the sad truths from a study published titled, “Asset Value of Whiteness” that unravels the relationship between race, class, and education.

Source: Asset Value of Whiteness

 

She writes:

“Demos and the Institute on Assets and Social Policy take a deep dive into the intrinsic link between racism and capitalism; specifically, how whiteness infests the so-called American dream and renders it inaccessible to anyone who doesn’t meet the pre-selected criteria.”

Savali quotes Amy Traub, who is the co-author of the report:

“For centuries, white households enjoyed wealth-building opportunities that were systematically denied to people of color. Today our policies continue to impede efforts by African-American and Latino households to obtain equal access to economic security.”

Read the full article here.

While more covert, this sort of “asset value” mirrors the Jim Crow Laws. For an historical, yet contemporary look at discrimination, visit here.

Read more Breaking News here

 

Join Us on February 25, 2017 for ABHM’s Founder’s Day Gathering!

 

 America can heal from its troubled racial history.

Join us to learn how.

The Gathering for Racial Repair and Reconciliation

Our annual Gathering celebrates the legacy of America’s Black Holocaust Museum founder, Dr. James Cameron. In his honor, we bring together people from all corners of Greater Milwaukee for learning, dialogue and fellowship.

Saturday, February 25, 2017

Centennial Hall • 733 N. 8th Street • Milwaukee WI


 

This year’s topic:

Let’s Face It: How Communities Remember and Repair Racial Trauma

We’ll explore these questions:

  • How should America commemorate some of the most disturbing chapters of our racial history?
  • How might that commemoration help or hurt victims, perpetrators and bystanders.
  • What role should our museums and institutions play in the work of memory and racial healing? 

 

 

 

MORNING SESSION

9:00 -11:30 am Open to General Public & Sponsors. Tickets on sale here.

 

Introduction: Let’s Face It!

Listen to a short talk by ABHM Head Griot Reggie Jackson about the importance of truth-telling, remembrance, and ABHM’s role as a memorial museum in healing our city and nation.

 

 

 

 

Sneak Preview of a New Film, Always in Season

Experience a premiere preview of a new film that documents how lynching still impacts Americans to this day. It shows how descendants of victims and perpetrators in four communities are working to acknowledge the victims, repair the damage, and reconcile. View the film trailer here and the film website here.

Audience Talkback with Film Director and National Community Experts

Interact with film director Jacqueline Olive.  Jackie creates documentary projects that tell stories underrepresented in mainstream media. She coordinated the production of the Emmy award-winning PBS series, Independent Lens, and the internationally-themed documentary series, Global Voices. She will be joined on stage by members of the communities represented in Always in Season. Additional experts from around the country and Greater Milwaukee will also introduce their restorative projects. All presenters will then take questions and comments from the audience. (See the list of additional national and local presenters below.)

 

 

In addition, there will be:

  • Live music
  • Book sales & author signings

 

AFTERNOON SESSION

12:15 – 4:15 pm – Open to Event Sponsors and their guests only.

(Organizations and individuals wishing to become Sponsors, please click here

for Sponsorship Opportunities, Benefits, and Response Form.)

Luncheon Keynote Address: Why Commemorate?

Listen to public historian Doria D. Johnson address the impact of remembering of racial trauma on victims and the ethics of doing such memory work.  An expert in US and African American history, Doria’s great-great-grandfather Anthony Crawford was lynched in 1916.  In 2005 she successfully pressed the US Senate to apologize for failure to enact federal laws against lynching. A memorial to her grandfather was recently dedicated in the town where he was murdered.

 

Roundtables (Small Group Dialoguing and Networking)

Attend two different roundtable discussions of your choice during the afternoon. This is a chance to talk in depth with two of the expert presenters and to network with other attendees who share your interest in particular topics.

(Preview the presenter/topic list below.)

 

 

Action Plans and Closing Ceremony

We’ll gather as a full group to reflect on:

  • what have we learned from other communities,
  • what might Greater Milwaukeeans do to as a result of this Gathering, and
  • how can we support each other in repairing and healing our community?

 

Our Roundtable Facilitators

Henry Banks (Duluth MN) – Mr. Banks co-founded the Clayton Jackson McGhie Memorial Project in Duluth, MN, the downtown memorial plaza built by this small city built to commemorate the infamous lynching of three circus workers. Henry is also the host of the regular weekly People of Color talk show on Wisconsin Public Radio.

Karen Branan (Washington DC) – Ms. Branan is the author of the Pulitzer Prize nominated memoir The Family Tree: A Lynching in Georgia, A Legacy of Secrets, and My Search for the Truth. Karen has long been active in Coming To The Table, a national organization that pairs descendants of lynching perpetrators and victims, as well as slaveholders and enslaved people, for the purpose of repair and reconciliation.

 

Randy Gamble (Memphis TN) – An anti-racism activist for many years, Mr. Gamble is a leader of the Lynching Sites Project of Memphis. LSP is part of Bryan Stevenson’s Equal Justice Initiative to memorialize over 4,000 known lynchings in our country between 1877 and 1950 through local community remembrance projects and a new national lynching memorial. The Memphis lynching of three black men launched Ida B. Wells on her anti-lynching campaign; Randy and the Downtown Clergy Association are organizing a 125th anniversary commemoration of those victims.

Cassandra Greene (Atlanta GA) – Ms. Greene is Director of the Moore’s Ford Bridge lynching re-enactment, which has, for the last seven years, commemorated the victims of that lynching in a small town in Georgia. That re-enactment is featured in the film Always in Season and can be seen in its trailer. Cassandra is also founder/CEO of the W.I.T.N.E.S.S. PROGRAM/ W.O.W.W. where she teaches communications and serves as a minister in Georgia’s State and Federal prisons.

 

Pardeep Singh Kaleka (Franklin WI) – A former Milwaukee cop, after his father was killed by a white supremacist in the Sikh Temple massacre, Mr. Kaleka paired up with a former violent white power extremist to found Serve2Unite, which teaches schoolchildren peacemaking through the Sikh principles of Chardi Kala: fearless creative compassion, service to others, and relentless optimism in the face of adversity. Pardeep is also a psychotherapist at the D & L Healing Center, where he specializes in treating trauma.

Brad Lichtenstein (Milwaukee WI) – An award-winning documentary filmmaker, Mr. Lichtenstein is developing a feature film that digs into unsolved Klan murders of black men in Mississippi. Despite the 2007 Emmett Till Act giving the FBI $100 million to investigate these crimes, their families have no answers. The murderers walk free. The film explores whether and how the trauma of unresolved violence can be healed.

 

Erin McCarthy and Colleen Perry (Greendale WI) – Middle school teachers in a white suburb of Milwaukee, Ms. McCarthy and Ms. Perry persuaded their principal and students’ parents of the value of regularly teaching African American history as a part of – not a sidebar to – American history. Erin and Colleen present history as a complex story of complex people in America’s complex society and teach it by building empathy, defining race and developing the whole child.  Through their inquiry-based curriculum, they build responsible citizens and communities.

Warren Read (Seattle WA) – Author of the memoir, The Lyncher in Me: A Search for Redemption in the Face of History, Mr. Read offered public apologies to each of the families of the three circus workers lynched in Duluth on the occasion of the dedication of the memorial to them there. Warren is also an elementary school teacher and educational leader/administrator.

 

Maria Cunningham and Jordan Davis (Milwaukee WI) – Active volunteers with the Dr. James Cameron Legacy Foundation, Maria serves as the Foundation board’s Vice-President and Jordan as a Public Programming Administrative Assistant. Milwaukee Public Library’s Rare Books Librarian, Ms. Cunningham led the project to digitize the dozens of booklets on African American history and race relations by Dr. Cameron, and created and manages a traveling exhibit about his life and writings for the museum. Mr. Davis is a Distinguished Graduate Student Fellow at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee in the Master of Sustainable Peacebuilding program. His research interests center on public and local history, heritage resource management, and the museology of Africa and the African Diaspora.


 

EVENT SPONSORS

(as of 1/4/16)

VISIONARY SPONSOR

This event is funded in part by a grant from the Wisconsin Humanities Council, with funds from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the State of Wisconsin. Any views, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this project do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities. The Wisconsin Humanities Council supports and creates programs that use history, culture, and discussion to strengthen community life for everyone in Wisconsin.

 

 

HISTORY SCHOLAR SPONSOR

 

 

 

FREEDOM-LOVING SPONSOR: BARBARA STEIN

 

 

WITNESS TO HISTORY SPONSORS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

KEYNOTE SPONSOR

 

 

 

 

FILM SCREENING & AUDIENCE TALKBACK SPONSORS:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TABLE SPONSORS:

Dr. Russell Brooker

Bev Colton

Marquette University’s

  • Office of Community Engagement
  • Office of Diversity and Inclusion

 

 

 

 

 

Sponsorship Opportunities and Benefits – Founder’s Day 2017

Founder’s Day: An Annual Gathering for Racial Repair and Reconciliation

Saturday, February 25, 2017 

9:00am to 4:15pm

Centennial Hall

738 N. 8th Street, Milwaukee WI 53202

Our annual Gathering celebrates the legacy of America’s Black Holocaust Museum founder, Dr. James Cameron. In his honor, we bring together people from all corners of Greater Milwaukee for learning and fellowship.

The theme of this year’s event is “Let’s Face It: How Communities Remember and Repair Racial Trauma.

MORNING SESSION: Open to Organizational Sponsors and the Public. Attendees see a sneak preview screening of the new documentary Always In Season. Immediately following the film, there will be an audience talkback with the film’s director. She will be joined on stage by experts from around the country and Greater Milwaukee who will briefly introduce their communities’ commemorative projects, then take questions and comments from the audience.

AFTERNOON SESSION: Open to Organizational Sponsors Only. Members of our co-sponsoring organizations attend the Founder’s Day Luncheon and Keynote Address, followed by intimate Roundtable Discussions with experts from across the country sharing restorative experiences from their communities.

Click here for

  • detailed description of the day’s program

  • national and local presenters’ bios and photographs

All event proceeds provide essential funding for the community education programs of the Dr. James Cameron Legacy Foundation, including America’s Black Holocaust Museum.

 

The Foundation advances the work of civil rights pioneer, Dr. James Cameron, by preserving and sharing the African American experience as part of American history and culture, promoting interracial dialogue, and fostering repair and reconciliation.

To sponsor the Gathering, contact Dr. Fran Kaplan at 414-445-7500 or dr.fran at abhmuseum.org.


Annual Sponsorship Opportunities for the Gathering

Visionary       

  • VIP status for the full day of celebration, 10 attendees.
  • Reserved seating for an additional 10 attendees for the morning session only.
  • Prominent logo recognition on the cover of printed Commemorative Event Program.
  • An opportunity to make opening remarks from podium during the Gathering, 1-2 minutes.
  • Podium recognition during the Founder’s Day Luncheon and Keynote Address.
  • Multiple exclusive posts via social media (Facebook and Twitter.)
  • Logo placement with hotlink on ABHM website (December 2016 – March 2017.)
  • Right of first refusal for Annual Gathering 2018, (expires November 1, 2017.)

Investment Requested $10,000

Freedom-Lover

  • VIP status for the full day of celebration, 8 attendees.
  • Prominent logo recognition in the printed Commemorative Event Program.
  • Reserved seating for an additional 10 attendees for the morning session only.
  • Recognition from the podium during the Gathering, during Film Screening and Founder’s Day Luncheon.
  • Multiple exclusive posts via social media (Facebook and Twitter.)
  • Logo placement with hotlink on ABHM website (December 2016 – March 2017.)

Investment Requested $5,000

Witness to History

  • VIP status for the full day of celebration, 4 attendees.
  • Reserved seating for an additional 10 attendees for the morning session only.
  • Name recognition in the printed commemorative Event Program.
  • At least one exclusive post via social media (Facebook and Twitter)
  • Name listed on ABHM website (December 2016 – March 2017)

Investment Requested $1,000


Special Opportunities for the Gathering in 2017

These opportunities are specific to the format of Gathering 2017 and may not be repeated in future years. Join the conversation and help Milwaukee learn from other communities’ strategies for promoting racial repair and reconciliation.

Film Screening and Audience Talkback: Always In Season

Exclusive Sponsorship – Investment Requested $2,500

  • VIP status for the full day of celebration, 8 attendees.
  • Reserved seating for an additional 10 attendees for the morning session only.
  • Prominent logo recognition in the printed Commemorative Event Program.
  • An opportunity to make remarks from podium during the Audience Talkback, 1-2 minutes.
  • Multiple exclusive posts via social media (Facebook and Twitter)
  • Logo placement with hotlink on ABHM website (December 2016 – March 2017)

Founder’s Day Luncheon

Exclusive Sponsorship – Investment Requested $2,500

  • VIP status for the full day of celebration, 8 attendees
  • Reserved seating for an additional 10 attendees for the morning session only.
  • Prominent logo recognition in the printed Commemorative Event Program.
  • An opportunity to make welcoming remarks from podium during Luncheon, 1-2 minutes.
  • Multiple exclusive posts via social media (Facebook and Twitter.)
  • Logo placement with hotlink on ABHM website (December 2016 – March 2017.)

Keynote Speaker

Exclusive Sponsorship – Investment Requested $1,500

  • VIP status for the full day of celebration, 6 attendees
  • Reserved seating for an additional 10 attendees for the morning session only.
  • Prominent name recognition in the printed Commemorative Event Program.
  • An opportunity to introduce the Keynote Speaker.
  • At least one exclusive post via social media (Facebook and Twitter.)
  • Name listing on ABHM website (December 2016 – March 2017.)

Table Sponsor

Limited Inventory, 24 – Investment Requested $300

  • Invitation for 3 attendees for the full day of celebration.
  • Seating for an additional 8 attendees for the morning session only.
  • Name on Table Marker during Founder’s Day Luncheon.
  • Name recognition in the printed Commemorative Event Program.
  • At least one exclusive post via social media (Facebook or Twitter.)
  • Name listing on ABHM website (December 2016 – March 2017.)

To sponsor the Gathering, please contact Dr. Fran Kaplan at 414-445-7500 by February 13th.


Thanks for joining with other organizations and individuals to invest in repair and reconciliation!

EVENT SPONSORS WHO HAVE SIGNED ON AS OF JANUARY 4TH

VISIONARY SPONSOR

This event is funded in part by a grant from the Wisconsin Humanities Council, with funds from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the State of Wisconsin. Any views, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this project do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities. The Wisconsin Humanities Council supports and creates programs that use history, culture, and discussion to strengthen community life for everyone in Wisconsin.

 

 

HISTORY SCHOLAR SPONSOR

 

FREEDOM-LOVING SPONSOR: BARBARA STEIN

 

WITNESS TO HISTORY SPONSORS

 

 

 

 

 

 

KEYNOTE SPONSOR

 

 

 

FILM SCREENING & AUDIENCE TALKBACK SPONSORS:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TABLE SPONSORS:

Dr. Russell Brooker

Bev Colton

Marquette University’s

  • Office of Community Engagement

  • Office of Diversity and Inclusion

 

This Day in History: Richard and Mildred Loving Plead Guilty to the Crime of Interracial Marriage

Photograph of Mildred Loving and Richard Loving dated June 12, 1967

By the Equal Justice Initiative

After marrying in Washington, D.C., in 1958, Richard and Mildred Loving returned to their native Caroline County, Virginia, to build a home and start a family. Their union was a criminal act in Virginia because Richard was white, Mildred was black, and the state’s Racial Integrity Act, passed in 1924, criminalized interracial marriage.

On January 6, 1959, the Lovings pleaded guilty to both charges. After their conviction and release, the Lovings fought the law that had branded their love a crime and, on June 12, 1967, won a United States Supreme Court decision that would change the nation.

Read more here

Read about the film adaption of their life here 

Read more Breaking News here

 

Schools prepare for Trump by creating safe spaces for undocumented students

(Fotolia)

From the grio.com

Amid the concerns for immigrant families about the new Trump administration schools all across the United States are taking steps to protect students.

During the 2016 election cycle, Donald Trump promised to deport undocumented immigrants and build a wall to keep them out of the States. What many are most afraid of is that he will undo Obama’s executive decision, the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals initiative. This is the what grants temporary deportation relief to so many young undocumented immigrants.

District of Columbia Public Schools chancellor, John Davis, wrote a Q&A for the District community that reminded both staff and families that students will not be asked about their immigration status. He also told families about DCPS-sponsored workshops that will fill them in on the details about their immigration rights.

It doesn’t end there. School boards in Minneapolis, Denver, and Los Angeles have all taken steps to set up safe havens and informed families that ICE agents are not permitted on campus.

Read the entire article here

Read more Breaking News here

 

Stunning Film Adaptation of ‘Fences’ Opens on Christmas Day

By

With his ten plays in The Pittsburg Cycle, playwright August Wilson mastered, narrated and documented the African-American experience throughout the twentieth century in the United States. From “Gem of the Ocean” to “Radio Golf,” each play set in a different decade revealed new challenges, joys, and nuances of the Black experience. August Wilson forced you to see; to bear witness to Black lives, by presenting full and complete human beings in his narratives….

It has been a long road for the film adaptation of August Wilson’s sixth play in his Pittsburg Cycle, and it seems now that the timing has never been so ideal. Set in the 1950’s, Wilson’s critically acclaimed “Fences” comes sparkling to life on the film screen with Denzel Washington in the director’s chair and starring as patriarch Troy Maxson; a middle-aged garbage collector who, despite living a respectable life, struggles deeply with internal dissatisfaction, defeat, and bitterness. Not to be outdone by Washington’s commanding performance, Viola Davis holds her own, exploding onto the screen as his wife, Rose, a long-suffering but hopeful woman, desperate to keep her family together amid racial turmoil, financial issues and dreams deferred.

The playwright August Wilson, shown in 2003, sought a black director to make a film version of “Fences.” Credit Ted S. Warren/Associated Press

Incredibly faithful to the original play which first debuted on Broadway in March of 1987, through Washington’s lens, Troy and Rose’s story gets expanded and stretched out spectacularly as if August himself were walking the audience through the narrative. Both Washington and Davis have mastered (having acted in the play in the 2010 Broadway revival) these characters – the dichotomy of what it means to be Black in America during this particular moment. To be at once joyful and deeply tormented…

Read the full review here and a the story of long road to making the film here.

More Breaking News here.

 

Inside a Report on Slavery and Its Legacy

The names of the slaves line the pages of the 19th-century ledger books. Hundreds of names. Harriett. Warwick. Godfrey. Squire Lockett. Nathan York. Robert. Solomon. Alfred.

A ledger that includes slave policy information is on display at the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture. Credit George Etheredge for The New York Times

In the 1840s, New York Life, the nation’s third-largest life insurance company, sold 508 policies on enslaved men and women. The beneficiaries? Slaveholders, who collected cash after a slave’s untimely death.

I spent much of the year looking at institutions, particularly universities, that benefited from this painful period of American history; the idea was to better understand how the legacy of slavery reverberates through our own times. So as I studied the names in the fraying New York Life ledgers at the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, I wondered: Could we identify their descendants?…

 

 

Read the complete story about how NYT reporter Rachel Swarns investigated and wrote about life insurance policies that allowed slave owners to recoup their slave’s “value” in the event of the slave’s untimely death.

More Breaking News here.

 

Obama: ‘America has not overcome legacy of slavery and Jim Crow’

By thegrio.com

Image courtesy of Comedy Central

During an interview with Trevor Noah, the host of “The Daily Show,” President Barack Obama spoke about the state of race relations in the United States.

The president noted that, in terms of race, the country “by no means overcome the legacies of slavery and Jim Crow and colonialism and racism.”

“Those who are not subject to racism can sometimes have blind spots,” he admitted when Noah, who is biracial as well and from South Africa, asked him how he approached conversations on race. However, the president noted that just because some people have a “lack of appreciation” for the lived experiences of others does not mean that they cannot learn or do not want to learn about it.

Read the entire article here

Watch the complete interview here

Read more Breaking News here