Breaking News

When the past is present…

“…The great force of history comes from the fact that we carry it within us, are unconsciously controlled by it in many ways, and history is literally present in all that we do.” James Baldwin

 

118 Black Men Tortured On His Watch–Less Than 4 Years of Jailtime

By Nick Chiles, Atlanta BlackStar

A Picture of Jon Burge

Jon Burge walked free after only three-and-a-half years in prison, despite having commanded the Chicago P.D. nightshift that tortured at least 118 black men.

Jon Burge is one of the most notorious crooked cops in American history—a man who oversaw the torture of more than 100 Black men over the course of decades while they were in the custody of Chicago police.

Burge strolled out of federal prison on Thursday, three-and-a-half years after beginning his sentence for his 2010 conviction for perjury and obstruction of justice for lying about police torture.

That’s right—Burge wasn’t even convicted for committing the torture, but instead for lying about it….

One of his earliest victims was Anthony Holmes, who in 1973 was electrically shocked by Burge, who put a plastic bag over his head while torturing him to elicit a signed confession for a murder Holmes said he didn’t commit. Holmes had to serve a full 30-year sentence for the murder—and has been unsuccessful in seeking reparations….

There are about 115 known victims who were tortured by Burge and his midnight crew from the early ’70s to the early ’90s, according to attorney Joey Mogul, who has been a vocal advocate for torture victims through the People’s Law Office and the Chicago Torture Justice Memorial Project.

Of that number, Mogul said only about 16 have received any sort of legal compensation from the city.

In total, the city of Chicago has had to pay $64 million in court settlements on Burge-related torture cases filed before the statute of limitations ran out.

Read the Full Article 

For more Breaking News, click here.

 

 

Cell Phone Video Captures Police Smashing Window, Using Stun Gun During Traffic Stop

By , huffingtonpost.com

A northwest Indiana police department is facing a federal lawsuit after a family claimed an officer used excessive force on them during a dramatic traffic stop captured via cell phone video.

Jamal Jones and his family are filing charges against an Indiana police department after officers smashed their car windows during a routine traffic stop. (ABC News)

Jamal Jones and his family are filing charges against an Indiana police department after officers smashed their car windows during a routine traffic stop. (ABC News)

Lisa Mahone was driving, along with her boyfriend Jamal Jones and two children, to visit Mahone’s ill mother at Stroger Hospital on Sept. 24 when they were pulled over by Hammond, Indiana, officers for a seat belt violation, the Post-Tribune reports.

According to the lawsuit, officers pulled them over in a “highly aggressive” manner, placing spike strips in front of the car and asking for both Mahone’s driver’s license, as well as Jones’ identification.

Jones told the police he did not have a driver’s license because he had recently been ticketed for not paying his insurance, per Mahone’s complaint, and when he went into his bag to show them the ticket, officers reportedly refused to look at the ticket, ordered Jones out of the vehicle and pulled out their guns. Jones refused to exit the vehicle “because he feared that the officers would harm him.”

Around this time, Mahone’s 14-year-old son began recording the exchange, using the camera on his cell phone. His footage, uploaded to YouTube on Oct. 5, captures Mahone talking to police on her phone in an attempt to explain the situation, as well as the ongoing exchange between Jones and the officers.

The video shows the officers breaking the car’s passenger window, spraying glass into the vehicle, and pulling Jones out of the car to arrest him. Officers also appear to use a stun gun on Jones while he is in view of the car. Mahone’s 7-year-old daughter can be heard crying in the background.

 

Read full article here.

Read more Breaking News here. 

 

Oscar-winning filmmaker premieres film at Milwaukee Film Festival

By Michele Fiore, Today’s TMJ4

MILWAUKEE – An Oscar-winning screen writer returned to his Milwaukee roots Saturday night.

John Ridley, Director of "JIMI: All Is By My Side," received an Oscar for the  screenplay of "12 Years a Slave."

John Ridley, Director of “JIMI: All Is By My Side,” received an Oscar for the screenplay of “12 Years a Slave.”

John Ridley made a red carpet appearance at the Oriental Theatre for the Milwaukee Film Festival. [Editor’s Note: This first-ever screening of his movie drew a sold-out crowd of well over 1000 movie-goers, plus several hundreds who waited in a “rush line” in the cold for tickets!]

Ridley won an Oscar for “12 Years A Slave” and he is now premiering his latest film, “Jimi: All Is By My Side,” [starring Andre Benjamin].

“I’m thankful. I mean this is amazing, just flying in,” he said. “I remember when I left and went to school and you hope and pray for a moment like this and it’s really, more than anything. It’s close to my mom’s birthday. It’s kind of like a gift. So thank you to everybody of Milwaukee,” Ridley said.

Ridley said the film fest fought hard to have his movie premiere in Milwaukee.

He’s currently working on a TV series in Texas called “American Crime.”

JIMI: All Is By My Side opens in theaters around the country today. For a trailer, venues and showtimes, click here.

On Saturday, October 4, 2014, the Milwaukee Film Festival was proud to host Milwaukee native and Academy-Award winning filmmaker John Ridley for the local premiere of his new film, JIMI: ALL IS BY MY SIDE. Mr. Ridley participated in an extended Q&A with Milwaukee Film Artistic and Executive Director Jonathan Jackson at the sold-out screening at the historic Landmark Oriental Theatre. Video by: Matthew Mixon

For more Breaking News, click here.

 

New York Is Cataloging, and Returning, Bloody Relics of 1971 Attica Assault

By SAM ROBERTS, newyorktimes.com

Inmates of Attica State Prison voicing their demands in 1971.

Inmates of Attica State Prison voicing their demands in 1971.

Forty-three years later, it remains a grisly benchmark: Aside from the Indian massacres of the late 19th century and an infamous 1921 race riot in Tulsa, the State Police assault that quelled the four-day uprising at Attica prison in upstate New York in 1971 was, investigators concluded, “the bloodiest one-day encounter between Americans since the Civil War.”

When it ended, 10 correction officers and civilian employees and 33 prisoners were dead — all but one guard and three inmates killed in what a prosecutor branded a wanton “turkey shoot” by state troopers.

Prosecutions stemming from the uprising were resolved long ago; scores of inmates and one state trooper were charged. Civil suits by relatives of the dead and injured were settled (the state paid $12 million, including legal fees, to families of the inmates, and another $12 million to families of prison employees).

But even after more than four decades, the scars have never healed.

This year, state officials finally began cataloging the bloodstained uniforms of both guards and inmates, barrels of baseball bats, a homemade cannon, makeshift knives and other ephemera that had been stored in a Quonset hut to determine which were personal belongings that could be returned to the victims’ families, and which other artifacts to ultimately discard or to retain for research or eventual display in the New York State Museum.

In August, property belonging to 12 state employees was identified. Their families were invited privately to Attica on Sept. 13, before the solemn annual public memorial service held to mark the end of the siege.

Eleven of the families accepted the state’s invitation. All but one left with some memento — a bloody or bullet-ridden uniform, a wallet, keys, a thermos, a cap — that the state Department of Correctional Services could establish as having belonged either to an individual or to an unknown colleague. The twelfth family was still considering the state’s offer.

“It was a shock,” recalled Vickie Menz, who discovered a package of personal items belonging to her father, Arthur J. Smith, when she returned to the prison for the memorial. “There was a box of my father’s things, the clothing that he was wearing for the five days he was a hostage. The pants were caked with mud. They hadn’t been laundered.”

Read full article here.

Read more Breaking News here

 

Harvesting Cotton-Field Capitalism

Edward Baptist’s New Book Follows the Money on Slavery

By 

former slave 1941

A woman who was born in slavery, photographed in Greensboro, Ala., in 1941. (Jack Delano/Library of Congress)

“Have you been happier in slavery or free?” a young Works Project Administration interviewer in 1937 asked Lorenzo Ivy, a former slave, in Danville, Va. Ivy responded with a memory of seeing chained African-Americans marching farther South to be sold.

“Truly, son, the half has never been told,” he said.

This anecdote is how Edward E. Baptist opens “The Half Has Never Been Told: Slavery and the Making of American Capitalism,” an examination of both the economic innovations that grew out of the ever-shifting institution of slavery and the suffering of generations of people who were bought and sold.

Mr. Baptist, a history professor at Cornell, said in an interview that his book represented his decade-long effort to blend these two aspects. Published in September, “The Half” joins a new wave of scholarship about the centrality of slavery — and the cotton picked by slaves — to the country’s economic development.

Edward E. Baptist, author of a new book on how slavery built the US economy, found it emotionally difficult to accept his research findings. He is a native Southerner. (Brandon Dill for The New York Times)

Edward E. Baptist, author of a new book on how slavery built the US economy, found it emotionally difficult to accept his research findings. He is a native Southerner. (Brandon Dill for The New York Times)

Mr. Baptist shows the ways that new financial products, bonds that used enslaved people as collateral and were sold to bondholders in this country and abroad, enriched investors worldwide. He also emphasizes viciously enforced slave labor and migration. The cotton boom led planters to sell slaves — one million moved from old to new slave states from the 1790s to the 1860s. Productivity, he argues, came through punishment….

As he writes in the book: “The idea that the commodification and suffering and forced labor of African-Americans is what made the United States powerful and rich is not an idea that people necessarily are happy to hear. Yet it is the truth.”

Suresh Naidu, a Columbia University economist who also studies slavery, said economists would call for even more quantitative evidence for Mr. Baptist’s arguments but said his book was a “great interpretation of slavery.” Economic historians have tended to focus on how market forces blunted the worst aspects of slavery, Mr. Naidu said, but Mr. Baptist demonstrates how the drive for profit exacerbated physical punishment and forced migration….

Slave Punishment: Wilson Chinn, a freed slave from Louisiana, poses with equipment used to punish slaves. Such images fueled Northern resolve against slaveholders during the American Civil War (photographed in 1863). (Photo Credit: CORBIS)

Slave Punishment: Wilson Chinn, a freed slave from Louisiana, poses with equipment used to punish slaves. Such images fueled Northern resolve against slaveholders during the American Civil War (photographed in 1863). (Photo Credit: CORBIS)

His own journey into that past was intellectually satisfying but sometimes emotionally challenging, Mr. Baptist said. He recalled reading an interview with a woman whose enslaved mother toiled in the fields of a small Kentucky farm in the 1850s, sometimes returning home to discover that another child of hers had been sold away.

“In 1850, people could have given up,” Mr. Baptist said. “There was no reason to expect this would end anytime soon. That was a moment, reading that interview, that brought home all the implications of the history.”

Read the full article here.

Read more Breaking News here.

 

Talking White

By , slate.com

“All right, hear me out,” begins the young black woman in a video uploaded to the website LiveLeak last Friday. “There is no such thing as ‘talking white,’ … it’s actually called ‘speaking fluently,’ speaking your language correctly. I don’t know why we’ve gotten to a place where as a culture—as a race—if you sound as though you have more than a fifth-grade education, it’s a bad thing.”

She continues like this for nearly two more minutes, emphasizing the point that her speech reflects proper English and attacking the idea that it’s a deviation from black identity.

If she was hoping for a positive response, she got it. In addition to thousands of shares and tweets, it reached more than 560,000 views and made the front page of Reddit.

Not that this was a surprise. The main ideas—that black Americans disparage “proper English” and education and use a “broken” version of the language—have wide currency among many Americans, including blacks.

“Ebonics” is mocked as a fake language, and efforts to use it in schools have

A 2005 study found that “black adolescents are generally achievement oriented and that racialized peer pressure against high academic achievement is not prevalent in all schools.”

A 2005 study found that “black adolescents are generally achievement oriented and that racialized peer pressure against high academic achievement is not prevalent in all schools.”

sparked vocal opposition. When the Oakland, California, school board approved Ebonics for use in its schools in 1996, a flurry of public figures condemned the decision. “I understand the attempt to reach out to these children, but this is an unacceptable surrender, bordering on disgrace,” said the Rev. Jesse Jackson, who later reversed his stance, but not before he was endorsed by a wide range of people.

At the time, linguists protested the criticism, noting the extent to which Ebonics—officially known as African American Vernacular English—is recognized as a language system with its own grammar and pronunciations, with roots in the regional dialects of 17th-century Great Britain. Far from being slang or broken, AAVE is a distinct form of English used by many blacks in informal settings.

Still, it is true that so-called “proper English”—otherwise known as Standard English—is associated with white people. And there are many anecdotes and stories of black teenagers disparaging one another for using Standard English or “talking white,” which also tends to come with accusations of “acting white.” And, as we can see from the video, it’s these accusations that stand as Exhibit A in arguments for the existence of black pathology. 

 

Read full article here.

Read more Breaking News here

 

Towers in Ethiopia that harvest clean water from thin air

From Africa Speaks for Africa

These towers, designed by an Italian architect, collect clean water from dew and fog.

These towers, designed by an Italian architect, collect clean water from dew and fog.

It’s one of the most precious resources on Earth, but its importance seems forgotten in the western world where its ease of access is often instantaneous. But for 768 million people worldwide, it’s a daily struggle to find safe water, and in result, 1,400 children under the age of five die from water-based diseases every day.

Inspired to offer solution to this issue in a creative way, designer Arturo Vittori invented stunning water towers that can harvest atmospheric water vapor from the air. The nearly 30-foot tall WarkaWater towers can collect over 25 gallons of portable water per day, and are comprised of two sections. The first is a semi-rigid exoskeleton built by tying stalks of juncus or bamboo together; the second, an internal plastic mesh similar to the bags oranges are packed in. The nylon and polypropylene fibers act as a scaffold for condensation, and once droplets of dew form, are funneled by the mesh into a basin at the base of the structure.

carrying_water_300

Women, who are usually the ones responsible for hauling water, carry on average 45 pounds of water at a time.

The crisis of water shortage caught Vittori’s attention while traveling through Ethiopia. “There, people live in a beautiful natural environment but often without running water, electricity, a toilet, or a shower,” he says. It’s common for women and children to walk miles to worm-filled ponds which are contaminated with human waste. There, they collect water in trashed plastic containers or dried gourds, then carry the heavy load on treacherous roads back to their homes. This is a process which takes hours and endangers the children by exposing them to dangerous illnesses. It also takes them away from school – ensuring that a cycle of poverty repeats.

Read the full article at Awareness.Com

Find more Breaking News here.

 

Orphans of Ebola Are Being Ostracized by Cautious Relatives

Children stand in a nursery while their parents are away at church on Sept. 28, 2014, in Monrovia, Liberia.

Children in a nursery while their parents are away at church on Sept. 28, 2014, in Monrovia, Liberia.

BY: , theroot.com

As of press time, the first Ebola victim had been diagnosed here in the U.S.—and approximately 3,000 people have died because of the Ebola outbreak in West Africa, but what has been neglected and underreported are the children the dead are leaving behind. West African orphans, many of them with one or both parents deceased, are being shunned by their surviving relatives who are scared to take them in for fear that the children have contracted Ebola as well, Al Jazeera reports.

“Ebola is turning a basic human reaction like comforting a sick child into a potential death sentence,” Manuel Fontaine, a regional director with UNICEF, explained.

“These children urgently need special attention and support; yet many of them feel unwanted and even abandoned.” 

UNICEF is making it its mission to tend to the people who are infected with the virus and also their families who are indirectly affected as well. The agency has asked the international donor community for $200 million in that regard. A quarter of that ask has been met. 

 

The U.S. has taken the lead in the global effort to put a stop to the epidemic. Of the 3,000 troops that President Barack Obama said he would send to the region to help coordinate the emergency-response efforts, 150 were dispatched Tuesday.

“We are supporting U.S. government and international relief efforts by leveraging our unique U.S. military capabilities,” said Gen. Martin E. Dempsey, Pentagon’s chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.

Al Jazeera reported that a recent U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report warned that the number of Ebola infections will double every 20 days if response efforts don’t ramp up.

According to Al Jazeera, “In a worst-case scenario, the number of Ebola cases could swell to 1.4 million by mid-January, U.S. health experts warned.”

Read full article here.

Read more Breaking News here. 

 

Ben Carson Likely to Run for President

By Breanna Edwards, theRoot.com

Ben Carson

Dr. Ben Carson says he is very likely to run for president of the US in 2016.
LAURA SEGALL/GETTY IMAGES

Ben Carson, the Johns Hopkins neurosurgeon-turned-Republican star, believes that the “likelihood is strong” that he will end up running for president in 2016.

“Unless the American people indicate in November that they like big-government intervention in every part of their lives, I think the likelihood is strong,” he said Monday on radio’s The Hugh Hewitt Show, according to the Washington Times.

Of course Carson, popular in conservative circles, is not rushing his decision, saying that he’s listening to voters as well as monitoring the 2014 landscape before making his final decision, which will come by May 2015 at the latest.

“I think the chances are reasonably good of that happening,” the Republican star added. “I want to make sure that it’s clearly something my fellow Americans want me to do. And I’m also waiting to see what the results are in November, because if the people indicate that they truly do want a nation that is for, [of] and by the people, then I—along with, I hope, many other people—would be willing to give it everything we possibly have.”

Read the full article here

Read more Breaking News here

 

Mostly Black Cities, Mostly White City Halls

Cleveland Stroud, the only black Council member in Conyers, Ga., says whites have represented their changing constituency well.

Cleveland Stroud, the only black Council member in Conyers, Ga., says whites have represented their changing constituency well.

By RICHARD FAUSSET, nytimes.com

CONYERS, Ga. — Since moving to this small city on the eastern flank of Atlanta’s suburban sprawl, Lorna Francis, a hairdresser and a single mother, has found a handsome brick house to rent on a well-groomed cul-de-sac. She has found a good public school for her teenage daughter.

Something Ms. Francis, who is black, has not found is time to register and vote. She was unaware that the most recent mayoral election was held last November.

“Life’s been busy — I’ve been trying to make that money,” Ms. Francis said one morning this month from her two-car garage, where she was micromanaging a particularly complex hairdo for a regular client. “And honestly, I only vote in major elections.”

That kind of disengagement is one of the many reasons that only one of the six elected positions in this municipality of 15,000 is held by an African-American, even as a wave of new black residents has radiated out from nearby Atlanta, creating a black majority here for the first time in the city’s 160-year history.

Disparities between the percentage of black residents and the number of black elected officials are facts of life in scores of American cities, particularly in the South. The unrest that followed the shooting death of 18-year-old Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo., has emphasized how much local elections can matter, and prompted a push there for increased black voter participation.

The disparities result from many factors: voter apathy, especially in low-visibility local elections; the civic disconnect of a transient population; the low financial rewards and long hours demanded of local officeholders; and voting systems, including odd-year elections, that are often structured in a way that discourages broad interest in local races.

But Ferguson has become a vivid example of the way a history of political disengagement and underrepresentation can finally turn toxic.

Read full article here.

Read more Breaking News here