Breaking News

When the past is present…

“…The great force of history comes from the fact that we carry it within us, are unconsciously controlled by it in many ways, and history is literally present in all that we do.” James Baldwin

 

Google partners with Howard University to develop future black engineers

From: The Grio

Recently, Google announced the beginning of a new program partnered with Howard University. The new program is part of an effort to recruit more young black minds and promote greater diversity in the engineering industry.

As The Grio writes in their article,Howard has opened a campus at the Googleplex, called Howard West, ‘a physical space on campus where Howard students and Googlers can grow together,’ and hopefully will encourage diversity in a field that sorely needs it.”from Google/Justin Sullivan via Good Black News

from Google/Justin Sullivan via Good Black News

This program stands as a step in the right direction, advancing the diversification of Silicon Valley while investing in the futures of young black men and women. Google has hopes to expand the program to other Historically Black Colleges and Universities.

To read more about the program, or for more information on Howard University and Google’s new partnership, head here.

Read more about the importance of community diversification and understanding past-to-present racial segregation here.

 

Jay Z and Harvey Weinstein to Bring Trayvon Martin’s Story to Film and TV

From: Colorlines

Written By: Sameer Rao

In the article “Jay Z and Harvey Weinstein to Bring Trayvon Martin’s Story to Film and TV,” culture reporter/blogger Sameer Rao highlights Jay Z Carter’s collaboration with producer Harvey Weinstein to create a narrative film and docuseries on the 2012 murder that lit the fuse of the Black Lives Matter movement.

Rao explains:

“…Jay Z and The Weinstein Company won a bidding war for the rights to two books about Martin: Rest in Power: The Enduring Life of Trayvon Martin and Suspicion Nation: The Inside Story of the Trayvon Martin Injustice and Why We Continue to Repeat It.”

L to R: Jay Z, Harvey Weinstein and Trayvon Martin. Jamie McCarthy/Getty Images; Colorlines Screenshot from Facebook

He continues:

“…the books will be adapted into a six-part documentary series produced by Jay Z. The Weinstein Company will co-develop the narrative feature film. These still-untitled projects are part of Jay Z’s two-year production deal with The Weinstein Company.”

Read about how another tragedy inspired Dr. James Cameron’s memoir here.

Visit our Breaking News Page here.

 

#MissingDCGirls Finally Caught People’s Attention, but How Do You Bring Them Home?

From: The Root

Written By: Yesha Callahan

In the article “#MissingDCGirls Finally Caught People’s Attention, but How Do You Bring Them Home?,” senior editor Yesha Callahan writes about the increasing number of African American teens that have been disappearing from the Washington D.C. area since February. Furthermore, she points to the lack of police efforts in addressing the possible causes of these disappearances.

Callahan explains:

“But where are the missing? Sure, as I said previously, some were runaways and do return home. But that can’t be true of all 22 people currently missing.”

Metropolitan (D.C.) Police Department

She continues:

“But with 22 teens reported missing over the last two months, that’s still 22 too many. And 22 too many to deny that there could possibly be an issue with trafficking in the area. I’m not an expert in sex trafficking, but one reason it’s plaguing the country is that these people move in silence. They’re your everyday police officers (see above) and average joes out here pimping young teens (and I’m not going to just say girls, because it happens to boys, too).”

See a video clip here.

Read More About the History of Human Trafficking in ABHM’s exhibit Kidnapped: The Middle Passage.

Visit our Breaking News Page here.

 

Deportation of African and Other Black Immigrants Quietly Increasing

By David Love

Wikimedia Commons

Although often not covered in the media, the African immigrant community is facing mass deportations in the era of Donald Trump. While the immigration debate in the U.S. is often framed in terms of undocumented immigrants from Mexico and Central America on the one hand and the infamous Muslim travel ban on the other, the issue is more complicated. As the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agency conducts its sweeps on immigrant communities, African people are among those who are being detained and deported. While deportations were in no short supply under the Obama administration, these deportations are expected to soar under Trump, whose immigration ban on six Muslim nations includes three African nations — Libya, Somalia and Sudan. Trump also is clamping down on refugees and asylum seekers.

According to data from the Department of Homeland Security, in 2015, ICE deported 1,293 African immigrants. Since the 2016 election, the ICE raids on Black immigrant communities have intensified. For example, in January, 86 men and women were deported to Mogadishu, the capital of Somalia, after being detained and imprisoned, as Africanews.com reported. In November, 108 immigrants were deported to Ghana and 20 people also were deported to Liberia, while 53 others were processed for deportation. Earlier this month, ICE deported 130 people to Senegal, six times the number recorded by the agency in its 2016 report.

Read the entire story here

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See Award-Winning Film & Support ABHM!

Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority

(the Theta Zeta Chapter at Marquette University)

proudly presents

the MILWAUKEE PREMIERE of
Service To Man”

to benefit
America’s Black Holocaust Museum

FILM SCREENING & TALKBACK WITH DIRECTOR

Sunday, March 26th – 3:00-5:30pm

MU’s Varsity Theater
1324 W. Wisconsin Avenue
Milwaukee WI

Buy tickets online: $8/student (grade to grad) – $13/adult
(or $2 more at the door)

MU Students FREE with ID

ABOUT THE FILM: Pressed by his professors and peers at historically black Meharry Medical College, Eli Rosenberg must discover who he really is and what he truly values. A tale both moving and humorous about coming of age as a “fish out of water” in Nashville during the turbulent ’60s.  Inspired by the true story of the first white student admitted to this august African American institution.

Winner of the prestigious American Black Film Festival Grand Jury Prize and

  • Best of Fest at the DC Independent Film Festival
  • Best Feature at the International Black Film Festival
  • Audience Choice Awards at the 2017 Tallgrass and Sidewalk Film Festivals, among others.

The film stars Keith David and Lamman Rucker, both stars of the currently running Oprah Winfrey Network series Greenleaf.

ABOUT THE DIRECTOR: Aaron Greer was born and raised in Milwaukee and educated in Milwaukee Public Schools. His first feature film, Gettin’ Grown, won many awards, including the Audience Choice at the Milwaukee Film Festival, and is distributed by Warner Home Video. Greer is the Director of the Film and Digital Media Program at Loyola University in Chicago where he teaches film studies and production.

INTRODUCTION TO THE FILM:  ABHM Griots Reggie Jackson and Dr. Fran Kaplan will give a brief talk about the relationship between Jews and HBCUs (Historically Black Colleges and Universities), including their rescue from the Holocaust of dozens of Jewish refugee professors.

 

 

Lights! Camera! Action! Shooting the lab scene at an Alabama HBCU, Stillman College, which stood in for Meharry.

OUR MANY THANKS TO:

  • Sigma Gamma Rho (Theta Zeta Chapter) for organizing and staffing this film and fundraiser.
  • Gettin’ Grown Productions LLC for generously donating this film for screening.
  • The Black Lens Program of Milwaukee Film for joining us as a program supporter.

 

Horror Film About Racism Earns Coveted 100 Percent On Rotten Tomatoes

From: Huffington Post Black Voices

Written By: Carla Herreria

Herreria writes:

“‘Get Out,’ a psychological thriller about racism written and directed by Peele, earned a coveted 100-percent score on the film review aggregation website Rotten Tomatoes.”

In a recent post, “Horror Film About Racism Earns Coveted 100 Percent On Rotten Tomatoes,Carla Herreria expresses critics’ reviews in a newly released horror film titled Get Out that frames racism as the central plot.  

The author also quotes Jordan Peele:

“It just seemed to be a very taboo piece of the discussion to talk about something so horrific as racism in any type of genre other than a film about slavery or something.”

Finally, she quotes Variety critic Peter Debruge’s review:

“[The film] delivers ‘a gloriously twisted thriller that simultaneously has so much to say about the state of affairs in post-Obama America.’”

Read the full article here.

Read more Breaking News here.

 

My Black History: The Case for Black Art in an Anti-Presidential Era

From: The Root

Authored by: Maiysha Kai

Anastasia_Aleksieieva for iStock

InMy Black History: The Case for Black Art in an Anti-Presidential Era”, Maiysha Kai explains the power black art holds in the current political state of the United States.

She explains how, “The Black Arts Movement that followed was a direct response to the loss of our most prominent leaders of the 1960s, as well as our subsequent rejection of the desire to assimilate into any American culture invested in our marginalization. Even hip-hop has origins in the response of black and brown youths to a society that simultaneously disenfranchised and criminalized them en masse, the tenor of which would come to a head in the turbulent rise of “gangsta rap” in the 1990s.” 

Kai explains how African American’s are empowered through their art; letting their art speak social change by being an “expression of resistance but also a visible and visceral expression of the human experience.”

With the loss of an African American President, there is widespread “post-black”  and “post-racial” which in turn is leading to the “rise of black art in America.”

Read more Breaking News from ABHM here!

To read the full article, check out The Root!

 

Chicago Violence Requires A Real Commitment, Not A Passing Presidential Tweet

From: Huffington Post Black Voices

Written by: Rev. Al Sharpton 

In the recent blog post “Chicago Violence Requires A Real Commitment, Not A Passing Presidential Tweet,” Reverend Al Sharpton reflects on gun violence in Chicago and the need for real commitment to address this problem.

Sharpton explains:

“Donald Trump recently met with some supporters and appointees who he misled the press into believing was a meeting with African-American leaders, ostensibly as a form of outreach to our community.”

He continues:
“…it is abundantly clear that Trump is not reaching out to us appropriately, nor getting the correct input on our concerns. We need a real commitment—not a passing presidential tweet.”

SCOTT OLSON VIA GETTY IMAGES

See a video clip here.

Read more about “Chicago’s Grim Era of Police Torture.”

Read more about the relationships among gun violence, power, privilege, and the politics of gun ownership here.

Visit our Breaking News Page here.

 

A More Abundant Share — The Future Of Food Is Black

From: The Huffington Post: Black Voices 

Authored By: Shakirah Simley

“When Life Gives You Lemons” by Kohshin Finley

In the article “A More Abundant Share – The Future Of Food Is Black,” Shakirah Simley explains how food symbolizes deep cultural connections, generational ties to family, and acts as a symbol of power. The good food movement is the idea that, “In a very real sense, the future of food is people. And that future looks a lot like me: a young, black woman, hungry for change.”

According to Simley, the food industry can be found at the root of many issues in society: “When Black and Native American farmers faced decades of systemic bias in access to capital and credit and land loss from the USDA – it’s a food problem.” Simley describes how the “good food movement” has been ignored and pushed away for years because, “our national good food obsession can curate Instagrams of oozing sandwich stacks higher than black folks’ restaurant wages.” However, this movement goes hand in hand with the, “understanding that food injustice parallels racial injustice.”

Efforts have begun to counter this issue, Simley says, “We’re unapologetically disrupting white-dominated artisan food industries and leading our own kitchens.” This article works to repair the food system that for too long has been focused on white based communities.

Read more Breaking News from ABHM here!

To read the full article, check out Huffington Post: Black Voices!

 

Watch: My Black History: Michael Eric Dyson on How MLK’s Assassination Opened His Eyes

From: The Root

Video Created by: P.J. Rickards

 

To commemorate the month of February and its celebration of Black History, Michael Eric Dyson (author, professor, and ordained minister) reflects on how the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. changed Dyson’s perspective on racial injustice.

Dyson’s lesson learned from MLK’s assassination is best summarized as he states,

“…his death, which gave rise to so much in the aftermath, his blood mixed in the soil from it sprouted an entire new awareness and consciousness that led from his assassination to 40 years later to the inauguration of Barack Hussein Obama.”

Read more about Michael Dyson’s full reflection here.

 

To learn more about social justice organizations and leaders during the Civil Rights Movement click here.

 

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