#MissingDCGirls Finally Caught People’s Attention, but How Do You Bring Them Home?

From: The Root

Written By: Yesha Callahan

In the article “#MissingDCGirls Finally Caught People’s Attention, but How Do You Bring Them Home?,” senior editor Yesha Callahan writes about the increasing number of African American teens that have been disappearing from the Washington D.C. area since February. Furthermore, she points to the lack of police efforts in addressing the possible causes of these disappearances.

Callahan explains:

“But where are the missing? Sure, as I said previously, some were runaways and do return home. But that can’t be true of all 22 people currently missing.”

Metropolitan (D.C.) Police Department

She continues:

“But with 22 teens reported missing over the last two months, that’s still 22 too many. And 22 too many to deny that there could possibly be an issue with trafficking in the area. I’m not an expert in sex trafficking, but one reason it’s plaguing the country is that these people move in silence. They’re your everyday police officers (see above) and average joes out here pimping young teens (and I’m not going to just say girls, because it happens to boys, too).”

See a video clip here.

Read More About the History of Human Trafficking in ABHM’s exhibit Kidnapped: The Middle Passage.

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Black Teens Arrested While Waiting For the Bus

By Morgan Whitaker, Msnbc.com

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Deaquon Carelock, Raliek Redd and Wan’Tauhjs Weathers

Charges were dropped against three African-American teenagers who said they were waiting for a school bus last week when they were arrested by police. “After reviewing the facts associated with these arrests, I have decided to dismiss the charges in the interest of justice,” said District Attorney Sandra Doorley in a statement Tuesday. The basketball players said they were waiting for a bus in Rochester, N.Y., to take them to a scrimmage when police asked them to leave the area. When 17-year-old Deaquon Carelock and 16-year-olds Raliek Redd and Wan’Tauhjs Weathers pushed back against the officer’s request, saying they were following instructions from their coach, police arrested them. The teens were later charged with two counts of disorderly conduct. (. . .)

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“We tried to tell them that we were waiting for the bus,” Weathers added. “We weren’t catching a city bus, we were catching a yellow bus. He didn’t care. He arrested us anyways.” Police say the teens were obstructing pedestrian traffic and repeatedly ignored orders to disperse, according to a police report obtained by FOX station WROC. Police had been keeping an eye on the area after receiving complaints of loitering from a nearby store. The students’ coach said he had no reason to think they were causing trouble.“My guys were waiting for the bus like they normally do,” Jacob Scott, the student’s basketball coach, said. “I get to the scene after parking my car and three of my guys are handcuffed.”  (. . .)

Jacob Scott

Jacob Scott

“One of the police officers actually told me, if he had a big enough caravan, he would take all of us downtown,” Scott said, referring to himself and the other students waiting to attend the scrimmage on a day off from school.

“These young men were doing nothing wrong, nothing wrong,” he said of the arrested players. “They did exactly what they were supposed to do.” (. . .)

The teens posted bail, and the case is scheduled for disp(osition). “They are not bad kids,” Raliek Redd’s mother, Crystal Chapman, said. “They are awesome boys. They all have good grades in school. I don’t want them to be profiled at all.”

 

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