L’Oréal Fires Its First Trans Model After She Called Out White America’s Racism

By Lilly Workneh, HuffPost Black Voices

L’Oréal Paris has fired its first transgender model to join the brand just days after announcing the partnership.

L’Oréal released a statement on Twitter Friday morning saying the company “champions diversity” but decided to cut ties with Monroe Bergdorf, saying her comments calling out white America’s racism in a recent Facebook post are “at odds” with their values.

Bergdorf received big buzz earlier this week after L’Oreal announced her inclusion in a YouTube video ad for L’Oréal Paris True Match Foundation. But Bergdorf’s excitement was short-lived.

Santiago Felipe via Getty Images

By Friday, the company had disavowed comments the model previously made on social media, which surfaced in a report the Daily Mail published on Thursday.

The damning piece blasted Bergdorf over her comments, claiming she wrote that “all white people are racist.” Spectators highlighted how her words had been misrepresented and taken out of context, with some even suggesting that the story was a deliberate attempt to downplay Bergdorf entirely.

Bergdorf’s comments, which call out systemic racism in America and how white people benefit from special privileges, have since been deleted from her Facebook page but have been published elsewhere in full.

“Honestly I don’t have energy to talk about the racial violence of white people any more. Yes ALL white people,” Bergdorf reportedly wrote, going on to address the privileges afforded to them. “Because most of ya’ll don’t even realise or refuse to acknowledge that your existence, privilege and success as a race is built on the backs, blood and death of people of colour. Your entire existence is drenched in racism. From micro-aggressions to terrorism, you guys built the blueprint for this s***.”

“Come see me when you realize that racism isn’t learned, it’s inherited and consciously or unconsciously passed down through privilege,” she added.“Once white people begin to admit that their race is the most violent and oppressive force of nature on Earth… then we can talk.”

On Friday morning in the U.K., many expressed outrage with L’Oréal’s decision to denounce Bergdorf’s message, saying it highlights the hypocrisy of the company claiming to be “champions of diversity” while only embracing inclusion for goals driven by profit and actively condemning Bergdorf, a black trans woman, for speaking out about racism ― an issue that impacts people of color most.

“If you truly want equality and diversity, you need to actively work to dismantle the source of what created this discrimination and division in the first place,” she wrote. “You cannot just simply cash in because you’ve realised there’s a hole in the market and that there is money to be made from people of colour who have darker skin tones.”

Read the full article here.

Read about the history of race here.

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A More Abundant Share — The Future Of Food Is Black

From: The Huffington Post: Black Voices 

Authored By: Shakirah Simley

“When Life Gives You Lemons” by Kohshin Finley

In the article “A More Abundant Share – The Future Of Food Is Black,” Shakirah Simley explains how food symbolizes deep cultural connections, generational ties to family, and acts as a symbol of power. The good food movement is the idea that, “In a very real sense, the future of food is people. And that future looks a lot like me: a young, black woman, hungry for change.”

According to Simley, the food industry can be found at the root of many issues in society: “When Black and Native American farmers faced decades of systemic bias in access to capital and credit and land loss from the USDA – it’s a food problem.” Simley describes how the “good food movement” has been ignored and pushed away for years because, “our national good food obsession can curate Instagrams of oozing sandwich stacks higher than black folks’ restaurant wages.” However, this movement goes hand in hand with the, “understanding that food injustice parallels racial injustice.”

Efforts have begun to counter this issue, Simley says, “We’re unapologetically disrupting white-dominated artisan food industries and leading our own kitchens.” This article works to repair the food system that for too long has been focused on white based communities.

Read more Breaking News from ABHM here!

To read the full article, check out Huffington Post: Black Voices!

Watch: My Black History: Michael Eric Dyson on How MLK’s Assassination Opened His Eyes

From: The Root

Video Created by: P.J. Rickards

 

To commemorate the month of February and its celebration of Black History, Michael Eric Dyson (author, professor, and ordained minister) reflects on how the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. changed Dyson’s perspective on racial injustice.

Dyson’s lesson learned from MLK’s assassination is best summarized as he states,

“…his death, which gave rise to so much in the aftermath, his blood mixed in the soil from it sprouted an entire new awareness and consciousness that led from his assassination to 40 years later to the inauguration of Barack Hussein Obama.”

Read more about Michael Dyson’s full reflection here.

 

To learn more about social justice organizations and leaders during the Civil Rights Movement click here.

 

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