Blacks underrepresented at top colleges despite affirmative action

By: thegrio.com

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According to a new analysis by the New York Times, Black and Hispanic students are still more underrepresented at top colleges than they were 35 years ago, despite affirmative action policies.

The analysis found that, since 1980, when data for fall enrollment was first available from the National Center for Education Statistics, the share of Black freshmen has remained essentially unchanged….

The gap between college-age individuals and actual college students has grown from 3 points in 1980 to 9 points.

Terry Hartle, a senior vice president at the American Council on Education, noted that while minority students have certainly gained ground at institutes of higher learning, they have not done so at highly selective schools.

Credit: toptenuniversities.com -Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

And while programs like affirmative action can certainly help to bolster minority numbers at schools, the truth of the matter is…

Minority students are often confronted with lack of access to better teachers, better resources, and advanced courses,…

“There’s such a distinct disadvantage to begin with,” said David Hawkins, an executive director at the National Association for College Admission Counseling. “A cascading set of obstacles all seem to contribute to a diminished representation of minority students in highly selective colleges.”

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Being a Black Student on a White Campus

By Rhonesha Byng, HuffingtonPost.com

In an emotional video released earlier this week, students at the UCLA School of Law gathered to share their stories of being among the few black students on campus as part of an awareness campaign simply titled “33.”

According to the video, out of roughly 1,100 students, 33 of them are black, that’s three percent of the school’s student population. Official statistics reveal there are a total of 994 students enrolled getting their Juris Doctor, however, an official from the school says the video’s 1,100 figure likely includes students receiving their LL.M. (Master of Laws). (. . .)

The students expanded upon their feelings of isolation, and feeling like they have to represent their entire community.

“It’s a constant burden of pressure. I’m constantly policing myself, just being aware of what I say and how it can be interpreted because I essentially am the representation of the black community.”

One woman felt she had been automatically characterized as an “angry black woman” after she disagreed with the views of a particular professor and openly vocalized her thoughts.

“The fact that I was a black woman played a lot into why people stopped listening to me. I felt like if there were maybe more black women in the class, maybe just five of us, people could have seen more of a variation in our responses to what was going on in class and what I felt like was sexism in the classroom.” (. . .)

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