#MissingDCGirls Finally Caught People’s Attention, but How Do You Bring Them Home?

From: The Root

Written By: Yesha Callahan

In the article “#MissingDCGirls Finally Caught People’s Attention, but How Do You Bring Them Home?,” senior editor Yesha Callahan writes about the increasing number of African American teens that have been disappearing from the Washington D.C. area since February. Furthermore, she points to the lack of police efforts in addressing the possible causes of these disappearances.

Callahan explains:

“But where are the missing? Sure, as I said previously, some were runaways and do return home. But that can’t be true of all 22 people currently missing.”

Metropolitan (D.C.) Police Department

She continues:

“But with 22 teens reported missing over the last two months, that’s still 22 too many. And 22 too many to deny that there could possibly be an issue with trafficking in the area. I’m not an expert in sex trafficking, but one reason it’s plaguing the country is that these people move in silence. They’re your everyday police officers (see above) and average joes out here pimping young teens (and I’m not going to just say girls, because it happens to boys, too).”

See a video clip here.

Read More About the History of Human Trafficking in ABHM’s exhibit Kidnapped: The Middle Passage.

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AIDS Quilt Returns to Washington

By KYLE BLAINE for ABC News

AIDS quilt

AIDS quilt

The AIDS Memorial Quilt has returned to Washington, D.C., for the first time in 16 years, marking the 25th anniversary of The NAMES Project and thirty years in the struggle to stop the spread of HIV and AIDSaround the world.

Every morning volunteers take on the laborious process of unfolding the panels of the quilt on the National Mall and then packing them up in the evening, a process that can only be described as a labor of love.

The quilt has over 94,000 names of AIDS sufferers on it and has been seen by over 18 million people worldwide.  Through tours and special events, the quilt has raised over $4 million for direct services for people living with AIDS.

For the quilt’s creators, this patch of green lawn in the heart of the nation’s capital holds special significance — the quilt was first displayed there in October of 1987 during the National March on Washington for Lesbian and Gay Rights, a time when many felt the federal government was turning its back on the AIDS epidemic.

The quilt is the brainchild of San Francisco gay-rights activist Cleve Jones, who in 1987, helped found The NAMES Project. Today, the quilt consists of 48,000 panels and takes up 1.3 million square feet, making it impossible to view in its entirety at any one time. If a visitor were to spend one minute to view each panel, it would take over 33 days to see the entire quilt.

Today in Black History

Slave Tag

Slave Tag

On this date in 1862, the nations capitol ended slavery. President Lincoln signed an act abolishing slavery in the District of Columbia, an important step in the long road toward full emancipation and enfranchisement for African Americans.

Before 1850, slave pens, slave jails, and auction blocks were a common site in the District of Columbia, a center for domestic slave trade. This included compensation to slave owners for their lost “property” in a total amount of $993,407 dollars.

http://www.aaregistry.org/historic_events/view/slavery-abolished-washington-dc